April 27, 2014. After serving six months active duty as an officer (the requirement was four years active duty), he joined the New York Knicks in December 1967. [20] Only the third tallest on his team,[4] but called "easily the No. His best season scoring average was 16.1 points per game in the 1972–73 season, during which he also averaged a career-best 4.5 assists per game. Senator Bradley served in the U.S. Senate from 1979 to 1997, representing the state of New Jersey. [4], Improving from his mediocre freshman grades, Bradley graduated magna cum laude[11] after writing his senior thesis about Harry S. Truman's 1940 United States Senate campaign,[20] titled "On That Record I Stand",[30][31] and received a Rhodes Scholarship at Worcester College, University of Oxford. [28] He also holds the career point record at Princeton and many other school records, including the top ten slots in the category of total points scored in a game,[29] but likely could have scored many more points if he had not insisted so often on passing the ball, in what his coaches called "Bradley's hope passes", to inferior teammates closer to the basket; he only emphasized his own scoring when Princeton was behind[4]:46 or, as during the Wichita State game, his teammates forced Bradley to shoot by returning passes to him. He is a corporate director of Starbucks and a partner at investment bank Allen & Company in New York City. [49], In 1987 Bradley re-introduced legislation that would return 1.3 million acres of land in the Black Hills of South Dakota to the Sioux tribe that had been illegally seized by President Ulysses S. Grant under the threat of starvation of the tribe in 1877. Former New Jersey Senator Bill Bradley is a managing director of Allen & Company, an investment bank in New York, and the lead adviser to McKinsey & Company’s Institute on the Nonprofit Sector. Board of Directors of Green Dot Corporation. The following year, as a sophomore, he was a varsity starter in Butch van Breda Kolff's first year as coach of the Tigers. He then lost the New Hampshire primary 53-47%. [65][66][67] Bradley and Jackson have been close friends since they were teammates playing for the New York Knicks. After serving six months active duty as an officer (the requirement was four years active duty), he joined the New York Knicks in December 1967. Allen & Company LLC. He is a corporate director of Starbucks and a partner at investment bank Allen & Company in New York City. [19], In his sophomore year Bradley scored 40 points in an 82–81 loss to St. Joseph's[20] and was named to The Sporting News All-American first team in early 1963. Washington Post Series: The Life of Bill Bradley, A Private Journey Comes Full Circle Retiring in 1977, he ran for a seat in the United States Senate the following year, from his adopted home state of New Jersey. He has worked as a corporate consultant and investment banker. [31], After four years of political campaigning for Democratic candidates around New Jersey, Bradley decided in the summer of 1977 to run for the Senate himself, coinciding with his retirement from the Knicks. He majored in history at Princeton, and was present in the Senate chamber when the Civil Rights Act of 1964 was passed. [6] An active Boy Scout, he became an Eagle Scout and member of the Order of the Arrow.[8]. [20] The following year The Sporting News again named him to its All-American team as its only junior, and as its player of the year. [11], Bradley's basketball ability benefited from his height—5 feet 9 inches (1.75 m) in the seventh grade, 6 feet 1 inch (1.85 m) in the eighth grade,[8] and his adult size of 6 feet 5 inches (1.96 m) by the age of 15[4]—and unusually wide peripheral vision,[4] which he worked to improve by focusing on faraway objects while walking. [4] In 1965, Bradley received the Golden Plate Award of the American Academy of Achievement.[32]. [52] In 1990, a controversy over a state income tax increase—on which he refused to take a position—and his proposal on merit pay for teachers, which led the NJEA to support his opponent, turned his once-obscure rival for the Senate, Christine Todd Whitman, into a viable candidate, and Bradley won by only a slim margin. [41] In 1984, the Knicks retired his number 24 jersey; he was the fourth player so honored by the Knicks, after Willis Reed, Walt Frazier, and DeBusschere. He put ten pounds of lead slivers in his sneakers, set up chairs as opponents and dribbled in a slalom fashion around them, and wore eyeglass frames that had a piece of cardboard taped to them so that he could not see the floor, for "a good dribbler never looks at the ball. Same platform but with new and improved features. championships in 1965 and 1966 and the Amateur Basketball Association (A.B.B.A.) … View Bill Bradley’s media appearances for We Can All Do Better. He is also the Chair of the Advisory Council for Acumen Fund, a non-profit global venture fund that uses entrepreneurial approaches to solve the problems of global poverty.